NEWS

Assistant Professor of Practice Stephanie MacFarland is the TASH 2019 Recipient of the June Downing Breakthroughs in Inclusive Education Award. TASH, an international leader in disability advocacy, fights for human rights and inclusion for people with significant disabilities and support needs — those most vulnerable to segregation, abuse, neglect, and institutionalization.

The College of Education and TUSD formed a partnership to create Each One, Teach One – a program that seeks to bring more teachers of color into the field. Learn more in this KOLD feature.

Associate Professor of Practice Cindy Volk recently received a $1.25 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education to support and prepare educational interpreters for deaf and hard-of-hearing K-12 students.

Congratulations to Associate Director of Equity & Inclusion for Community Engagement Sherard Robbins, who was recently named a 40 under 40 winner for 2019! He and the other winners will be honored on December 2 at the 40 Under 40 Awards Breakfast Celebration hosted by the Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and the Arizona Daily Star.

The Sunnyside Unified School District and University of Arizona College of Education have created a pathway for people affiliated with the Sunnyside District to enter the teaching profession via a 17-month, fast-track degree program, Pathways to Teaching. Upon completion, Pathways participants earn a Bachelor’s Degree in Elementary Education with a K-8 teaching certificate and English as a Second Language Endorsement. The first cohort starts in January 2020.

"The scholarly accomplishments of Dr. Nicolazzo, which are linked to her accomplishments in outreach as a public intellectual and in her advising as a mentor are truly exceptional, exemplifying the best of what a professor can be. I can say with full confidence that Dr. Z Nicolazzo’s record of accomplishment is on a level achieved by only a couple of other scholars in that time. It is hard for me to imagine how anyone could have done more in their capacity as an assistant professor."

Read the article

One member from the Outstanding Book Award Committee deemed his book, “A fresh take on understanding white perceptions of racism.” Other committee members found Cabrera’s work, “a significant, important shift in research on diversity in higher education” and that it “transformed conceptualizations of past and ongoing cultural conflicts and constructs on campuses.”

Read the article

The task force was created in partnership with March for Our Lives AZ after attempts to create such a task force failed at the legislature during the last legislative session.

Read the article

The National Science Foundation has funded a  $4.8 million grant awarding an effort to create a culture of belonging in higher education STEM fields for low-income, high-achieving students from our community.

As Arizona students head back to class in August, so too will a group of about 50 middle and high school teachers who spent the summer working in industry as part of the University of Arizona College of Education Teachers in Industry program. The business-education partnership is in its 11th year of placing experienced teachers in Arizona industries each summer. 

Ben Anderson, a high school calculus teacher, has participated in the Teachers in Industry program for two summers, working at Oro Valley-based Simpleview, a software and web development company focused on destination tourism. He says his experience doing data analysis at Simpleview has exposed him to many of the soft skills needed to work in industry, which he can in turn pass along to his students. "What I think is really important for my students to learn is what does it mean to be an employee at an up-and-coming tech company or a prominent tech company? What are the perks of those types of jobs; what are the expectations of you?" said Anderson, who previously taught at Marana High School and will start a new position at Ironwood Ridge High School this year. "So, I talk about soft skills. It's critical to be able to work in a group, and it's critical to be able to share information."

Teachers in Industry aims to prepare middle and high school students for future careers in science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM, fields. "Teachers have an extra tool in their toolbox to really say (to students) why math is important, why they're learning physics and how that can relate to the careers of the future, particularly in the areas of STEM," said Javier Lopez, director of the Teachers in Industry program.

This text is extracted from UA News, written by Alexis Blue. Read the full story here.