NEWS

"The scholarly accomplishments of Dr. Nicolazzo, which are linked to her accomplishments in outreach as a public intellectual and in her advising as a mentor are truly exceptional, exemplifying the best of what a professor can be. I can say with full confidence that Dr. Z Nicolazzo’s record of accomplishment is on a level achieved by only a couple of other scholars in that time. It is hard for me to imagine how anyone could have done more in their capacity as an assistant professor."

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One member from the Outstanding Book Award Committee deemed his book, “A fresh take on understanding white perceptions of racism.” Other committee members found Cabrera’s work, “a significant, important shift in research on diversity in higher education” and that it “transformed conceptualizations of past and ongoing cultural conflicts and constructs on campuses.”

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The task force was created in partnership with March for Our Lives AZ after attempts to create such a task force failed at the legislature during the last legislative session.

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The National Science Foundation has funded a  $4.8 million grant awarding an effort to create a culture of belonging in higher education STEM fields for low-income, high-achieving students from our community.

As Arizona students head back to class in August, so too will a group of about 50 middle and high school teachers who spent the summer working in industry as part of the University of Arizona College of Education Teachers in Industry program. The business-education partnership is in its 11th year of placing experienced teachers in Arizona industries each summer. 

Ben Anderson, a high school calculus teacher, has participated in the Teachers in Industry program for two summers, working at Oro Valley-based Simpleview, a software and web development company focused on destination tourism. He says his experience doing data analysis at Simpleview has exposed him to many of the soft skills needed to work in industry, which he can in turn pass along to his students. "What I think is really important for my students to learn is what does it mean to be an employee at an up-and-coming tech company or a prominent tech company? What are the perks of those types of jobs; what are the expectations of you?" said Anderson, who previously taught at Marana High School and will start a new position at Ironwood Ridge High School this year. "So, I talk about soft skills. It's critical to be able to work in a group, and it's critical to be able to share information."

Teachers in Industry aims to prepare middle and high school students for future careers in science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM, fields. "Teachers have an extra tool in their toolbox to really say (to students) why math is important, why they're learning physics and how that can relate to the careers of the future, particularly in the areas of STEM," said Javier Lopez, director of the Teachers in Industry program.

This text is extracted from UA News, written by Alexis Blue. Read the full story here.

Professor Sheri Bauman was quoted in July’s Time magazine article, Inside Instagram’s War on Bullying. An expert on bullying, Bauman calls Instagram a “one-stop shop for the bully” because everything they need is there: an audience, anonymity, an emphasis on appearances, and channels that range from public feeds to behind-the-back group chats. Instagram executives are introducing comment warning, using AI to detect even borderline comments, as well as a feature called Restrict, a type of shadow ban in attempt to combat cyberbullying.

Forbes Magazine recognizes UA as one of the best employers in Arizona. Employees like Rebecca Ballenger have something to do with it. Ballenger, Associate Director for Worlds of Words, inspires creativity and deep thought in her approach with students and interns. She goes beyond that by building relevant experiences for local school groups visiting the world-renowned international literature collection, as well as hosting workshops for fellow employees.

Through a combination of project-based learning and strong mentoring, from both professionals and university students, Project POEM prepares visually impaired students for STEM fields, where they are sorely underrepresented.

Assistant Professor Jameson Lopez was part of a panel at UC Davis which showcased critical, diverse disciplinary perspectives in education. Lopez studies Native American education using Indigenous statistics and has expertise in the limitations of collecting and applying quantitative results to Indigenous populations. Lopez also recently gave the keynote for the Baboquivari college signing day. His speech was highlighted in a story by AZPM.

The 15th Annual Erasmus Circle Donor Recognition Reception, held at the beautiful home of Paul Lindsey and Kathy Alexander, honored our donors who support the College of Education.

The evening included a presentation on urban public education in the Age of Reform by alumnus Richard Carranza. Carranza is chancellor of the New York City Department of Education, the largest school system in the nation. He is responsible for educating 1.1 million students in more than 1,800 schools.