NEWS

Assistant Professor Vega received big-screen recognition from President Robbins at the Washington State vs UA men’s basketball game. She was named as an Arizona Champion for her work as a faculty member in education who advocates for the needs of culturally and linguistically diverse students.

Professor Umbreit received the Outstanding Leadership Award in the field of behavior disorders from the Council for Exceptional Children with Behavioral Disorders, for his significant contributions in the field. Former student Candace Gann attests, “I would not be where I am today in my academic career if it were not for Dr. John Umbreit.”

Disability & Psychoeducational Studies doctoral student Jaclyn Wolf attended the California Association of School Psychologists conference in San Diego in early November to present her research, Neighborhood risk and unsafe schools in relation to Latinx adolescents' academic engagement: Social cohesion and school respect as protective factors. Her findings indicate neighborhood and school risk, and protective factors are important to Latinx adolescents’ academic engagement.

The need for timely, responsive mental health services in school communities is growing. According to the National Alliance for Mental Health, as many as 20 percent of youth under the age of 18 will experience a mental health condition, yet only half will receive mental health services. That number is much lower for Hispanic, African-American, and Asian-American students. Addressing mental health in schools can reduce the drop-out rate, lower the risk of suicide, reduce risky behavior, improve help-seeking, and improve academic achievement. 

Assistant Professor of Disability & Psychoeducational Studies Desiree Vega and her doctoral student, Jaclyn N. Wolf, presented at the First Generation Southwest Symposium at Northern Arizona University in September. The presentation, College Enrollment and Persistence of First-generation Latinx Students, focused on the college-going experiences and success of first-generation Latinx college students.

Jared Schultz, PhD, a noted leader in disabilities education and research, has joined the UA College of Education as a professor in the Department of Disability and Psychoeducational Studies and the UA Sonoran Center for Excellence in Disabilities as the director of research. The Sonoran Center is housed within the UA Department of Family and Community Medicine, where Dr. Schultz also will have a joint appointment.  At the UA College of Education, Dr.

Mount Lemmon Sky Center was busy this June hosting middle and high school students kicking off an exciting new initiative called Project POEM (Project-Based Learning Opportunities and Exploration of Mentorship for Students with Visual Impairments in STEM). This million-dollar project funded by NSF provides hands-on learning over 14 months to VI students and fosters mentor/mentee relationships with UA students majoring in STEM areas. While STEM fields such as astronomy can be highly visual in nature, they shouldn’t be considered inaccessible to blind or low-vision students, says Sunggye Hong, associate professor in Disability and Psychoeducational Studies. Hong is collaborating with UA’s Planetary Sciences and the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory. The students will continue to participate in a science curriculum that uses 3-D modeling.
People with visual impairments continue to be highly underrepresented in STEM. “Not a lot of visually impaired students are choosing STEM as their potential career area,” Hong says. “We wanted to work together to come up with some motivational, inspirational, scientific projects that increase the motivation of kids who are blind or visually impaired toward STEM.”

This information came from azbigmedia.com, UA helps visually impaired ‘see’ science.

 

Professor Shirin Antia is the recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award by the Association of College Educators – Deaf and Hard of Hearing (ACE-DHH). This award honors Dr. Antia's contributions to the field across teaching, research and service in the preparation of teachers of students who are deaf or hard of hearing. Dr. Antia's career has been dedicated to improving the life of deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) children. As a leader in her field, she has positively affected the growth of many as a classroom teacher, as a mentor for graduate students, and as a first-class researcher. Kudos!

The College of Education is working with Changemaker High School on a project designed to raise awareness of cyberbullying and promote the spread of kindness online. School Counseling students, Sarah Heath Howe (far left) and Sarah Johnson (seated, second from right) meet weekly with Changemaker High School students to help them prepare for their summer trip to Japan. It will be the first time on an airplane for some of the students, like Ricardo Goodman (in the baseball cap).

The Association of Specialists in Group Work, a division of the American Counseling Association, names Professor Sheri Bauman recipient of the 2018 Eminent Career Award in recognition of her major contributions to the field of group work.