NEWS

Our Literacy, Learning, and Leadership majors represent a large portion of the undergraduates successfully adding internships to their college experience in preparation for their careers. We hosted a variety of community agencies at the College of Education Internship and Opportunity fair. Undergraduates were able to network and investigate internship opportunities by meeting representatives from many different organizations to learn just what an internship might entail.

Walter Doyle, interim head of the Department of Teaching, Learning, and Sociocultural Studies, has been awarded the American Educational Research Association's 2017 Legacy Award in its teaching and teacher education division. The award honors significant and exemplary contributions from leaders in the field.

Upcoming in March 2018 is Patty Anders’ retirement conference. Plan to bring a story, anecdote, memory, or joke to share, as a “Roast and Toast” in honor of Patty will kick off the events on March 8, 2018.

The conference, “Adolescent, Family, and Community Literacy: Mobilizing Strength Based Pedagogies,” invites teachers, community workers, and researchers to collaborate as a thought collective to connect theory and practice. It will be held March 9, 2018 from 8:30 to 5:30 pm.

In February, twenty-five COE students, most from the Literacy Learning and Leadership major, attended the 2017 National Collegiate Leadership Conference. This annual conference is student-run and offers leadership skill building and training to the hundreds of students who attend from all over the U.S. Navigate with Purpose was the conference theme, woven through the various workshops and networking events. Amanda Tachine, an alumna from our Higher Education program was a motivational speaker at the event.

UA access and retention of Native American students is on the rise, thanks in part to our Native SOAR program. In 2015, the UA enrolled a total of 390 Native American undergraduates, a 16 percent increase from 2013. The retention rate for Native American first-year students increased 7 percentage points, from 64 percent in 2014 to 71 percent in 2015. Native SOAR (Student Outreach, Access, and Resiliency) has Native American freshmen serve as peer mentors to Native American high school students.

Read about the accomplishments of our TLS students, alumni, faculty, and staff in 2016.

Read about the accomplishments of our TLS students, alumni, faculty, and staff in 2015.